The Temeraire Series (9 titles) – Naomi Novik

I first started the Temeraire series some years ago, but ran out of momentum on book 6 (The Tongues of Serpents) which had a very weak ending. But on this reread I felt driven to continue on through the rest of the books, which return the series to the high standards of the series start.

Set in Napoleonic times, dragons are as important to the defence of Britain as its’ navy is, and Temeraire is a large and talented dragon, so obviously forms a key part of this. But he is not given just this simple role, but instead we learn about more of his talents as he undergoes character development and finds his own place in the world. His companion Laurence has similar struggles as he makes life-changing moral decisions and deals with love, the war and friendship on firstly the terms of others, and gradually his own terms.

Each book moves around the world, although some settings are returned to, and the cast around Temeraire evolves as life for a deployed member of His Majesty’s Service continues. I like the imaginative way that dragons become part of the Napoleonic era without displacing true history too much, and how they do not instantly solve problems but instead present new ones. But the best subplot is the one around dragons’ personhood, set against a backdrop of the abolition of the slave trade by parliament. This beast that can destroy ships and kill soldiers without effort has far more interest as a political being than as a warrior.

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The Obernewtyn Chronicles (7 titles) – Isobelle Carmody

I was lent this series by a friend with a shared interest in young-adult fantasy series to entertain me as I recuperated from an episode of ill health that left me with a month to rest. They more than half-filled the box, but thankfully started as quite slim paperbacks that didn’t look as intimidating as the Red Queen does, with this paperback coming in at over 1100 pages.

The chronicles all stand well as individual books, but make a compelling longer arc as well. However as each book moved on, I felt increasingly like Elspeth had primarily been set an artificial quest rather than facing external issues until very close to the end. She also spends much of her time dependent on her guardian’s protections rather than her own skills and planning, to the extent that I wanted to read the guardian’s book as her story sounded much more interesting.

Even with a dreamworld linked to the real world, we also seemed to spend too much time there, and it was very much a revelations-style dreamworld. If I wanted to read a drugged nightmare then I would have started with a different type of book!

However the general world-building is brilliant, a genuinely post-apoplectic world where all modern technology has been lost into legends. How earlier miracles were worked is gradually being uncovered, and bigotry is challenged. Wars are fought, peace is negotiated and promises are (mostly) fulfilled.

Obernewtyn is a lot of lightweight escapist dystopian future fantasy. Worth reading for the world-building, as long as you aren’t looking for something that stands up to a critical read.