A Very British Coup – Chris Mullin

A political satire from a similar school of thought as Yes Minister, A Very British Coup describes the difficulties an extreme left-wing government would have in implementing its anti-establishment manifesto.

Mullin gives life to the corridors of power, creating a believable conspiracy agains the Labour government in the first two thirds of the book. Unfortunately the last third of the book does not live up to these expectations, as the conspiracy (whether intentional or not) ratchets up to fantastical levels.

This book should be longer, and this last third is left desperately tying up ends and characters which were begun in the first part of the book. Whether this is due to a slack editor or one which is addicted to page count is not clear however. This does not stop the book being an enjoyably humorous attack on the British establishment, which I enjoyed reading.

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A View from the Foothills – Chris Mullin

When the media was flooded with discussions about Lord Mandelson’s autobiography and speculating about what would be in Blair’s, I decided to read a more junior minister’s diaries, already published. A View from the Foothills contains the diaries kept by Chris Mullin from the first time he became a junior minister until the last time he was shuffled out of the cabinet.

Mullin was a part of the New Labour machine who was positioned to be part of many discussions with cabinet members and Blair, without being so close to the powerful parts that he found it necessary to adapt the truth as much as others may do. His role as the Home Affairs  Select Committee chair (when not in government) gave insights into how MPs acted on controversial topics, and as a constituency MP he has to cope with his local Labour party and tries to help constituents who fall the wrong side of the government machinery.

Throughout this, the book retains a sense of humour, with a high note being when he was confronted by a Daily Mail reader who tells him what is wrong with the world, and who’s fault it is. Mullin cuts short his complaints by completing his  final “I blame…” with “Anyone but yourself”. These humorous notes are not always appreciated by Mullin’s colleagues, but make the book a lighter read.