The Sport of Kings – C. E. Morgan

I’m not sure quite what I expected from The Sport of Kings, but this wasn’t it. It is a great American Novel in that tradition, a look at Kentucky social structures and racism, and a commentary on family relationships.

My teenage years reading horsey books proved valuable here, as I had a basic understanding of the breeding of Thoroughbreds, and how American horse farms can work. But at every section I was left struggling to keep up as the setting changed dramatically, especially with the first cut to Allmon. And I didn’t understand any of the Interludes or what they where adding to the story.

I still read it compulsively though, letting the threads pull the story together to a coherent whole, and appreciating how early foreshadowing was tied up in the last section of the book. It is clearly a well-structured book, with character depth and development. We see whole generations moving through the community, and social changes as history carries old practices away.

A well-written book, and although not one I would have chosen myself, the sort of book that is worth reading to gain perspective, even if the writer’s aims are at times opaque. As I am trying to read the women’s prize, the focus on me throughout much of this was disappointing, as was Morgan’s decision to publish with her initials rather than first name.

The Dark Circle – Linda Grant

Having cast aside The Lesser Bohemians, I picked The Dark Circle out of my library bag in its place. This was much more readable, written in a conventional third-person style, moving between points of view as the plot develops.

I appreciated the perspective on the dawning days of the NHS, and how rationing, waiting lists and condemnation of patients was always part of the culture. But the NHS itself was not the subject, far more how the circle of friends at the centre of this novel drew together, and each coped with and recovered from, their time in the institution. How they each managed in the prospect of death, and how ultimately each of them left.

It is a “coming of age” story, but one with a difference, in that the trial these young people pass through is one of its time. And the writing gives a perspective on that time, and a connection to the characters that makes the whole situation heartbreaking.

Very well-written, and a good selection of a slightly unusual subject-matter.

Unfinished: The Lesser Bohemians – Eimear McBride

This was not a good start to my Baileys challenge: I got 20 pages in and the writing style and subject were just irritating me. Skipped to page 100 and the writing style was the same breathless internal monologue, so I gave up. This one just wasn’t for me, so back to the library it goes.

Fool Moon: Dresden Files 2 – Jim Butcher

There’s not all that much to write about book 2 in a fast-paced series. Only that Butcher manages both continuity and pan-series arcs as well as an original and compelling plot. Dresden is a wonderfully flawed hero, trying to do good, but coming up against his own issues that make it all much harder. I’m hopful that these will be worked on through the series, as his understanding of them is already increasing.

The “Moon” title is a dead giveaway as to the supernatural theme of this book, but even here Butcher manages some originality, and I love Dresden’s tendency to go away, research and write a report for his client. No simple “turn up and do the fun stuff” for him – he’s working the same as everyone else who deals with the public sector in this millennium.

The twist at the end is satisfying, and I look forward to seeing this cast of characters in the next book: currently heading my way on order.